Soldier Combat Skills

Chapter 11-4 Equipment

This section discusses radio, wire, and telephone equipment.



RADIOS



11-12. Radios are particularly suited for use when you are on-the-move and need a means of maintaining command and control. Small handheld or backpacked radios that communicate for only short distances are found at squad and platoon level. As the need grows to talk over greater distances and to more units, the size and complexity of radios are increased. The enhancement in modern radio technology is based upon three basic radio systems, each with its own capabilities and characteristics: improved high frequency radio (IHFR), single-channel ground and airborne radio systems (SINCGARS), and single-channel tactical satellite communications (SATCOM). A radio set has a transmitter and receiver. Other items necessary for operation include a battery for a power source, and an antenna for radiation and reception of radio waves. The transmitter contains an oscillator that generates radio frequency (RF) energy in the form of alternating current (AC). A transmission line or cable feeds the RF to the antenna. The antenna converts the AC into electromagnetic energy, which radiates into space. Many radio antennas can be configured or changed to transmit in all directions or in a narrow direction to help minimize the enemy’s ability to locate the transmitter. A keying device is used to control the transmission.



AN/PRC-148 MULTIBAND, INTRATEAM RADIO



11-13. See Figure 11-6.


































Figure 11-6. AN/PRC-148 multiband intrateam radio (MBITR).


 

Receiver Transmitter Unit (RTU)

Range ………………………………………. Antennas …………………………………..

5 kilometers 30-90 MHz

Batteries ……………………………………

30-512 MHz (reduced gain below 90 MHz) Rechargeable Lithium-Ion (2) Nonrechargeable (2) and case

Optimal battery life……………………… Weight ……………………………………… Interoperability …………………………… Transceiver/battery holster System carrying bag

10 hrs 2 pounds AN/PRC-119 SINCGARS
 
 
 
 


Note: Actual battery life depends upon radio settings, environmental considerations, and battery age.



IC-F43



11-14. The IC-F43 portable UHF transceiver is a two-way, intersquad, land-mobile radio with squad radio voice communications and secure protection (Figure 11-7).



Range………………………………………………………………………. 2.5 kilometers (2,500 meters)
Optimal battery life……………………………………………………… 10 hours
Weight ……………………………………………………………………… Less than 1 pound
Interoperability…………………………………………………………… AN/PRC-119 SINCGARS



Figure 11-7. IC-F43 portable UHF transceiver.



RT1523A-D(SIP)



11-15. Running the self-test in the system improvement program (SIP) with COMSEC set to PT will produce a FAIL5 message. Change COMSEC to CT to clear the error message (Figure 11-8).

























Figure 11-8. AN/PRC-119A-D SIP.



Optimal battery life……………………………………..

10 to 30 hours

Weight ……………………………………………………..

13.7 pounds

Battery box………………………………………………..

CY-8523C

Dumb handset …………………………………………..

H-250

Control knobs


RT 1523E



11-16. See Figure 11-9 for more information about the advanced system improvement program (ASIP).






























Figure 11-8. AN/PRC-119E advanced system improvement program (ASIP).





Internal battery

Optimal battery life

33 hours

Weight

8 pounds

Smart handset

HRCRD

New keypad

Control knob


WIRE



11-17. The decision to establish wire communications depends on the need; time required and available to install and use; and capability to maintain. The supply of wire on-hand, the expected resupply, and future needs must also be considered. Wire communications can be used in most terrain and tactical situations. When in the defense, units normally communicate by wire and messenger instead of by radio. Your leaders will often have you lay the wire, and install and operate the field phones.



11-18. A surface line is field wire laid DR-8 laid on the ground. Lay surface lines loosely with plenty of slack. Slack makes installation and maintenance easier. Surface lines take less time and fewer Soldiers to install. When feasible, dig small trenches for the wire to protect it from shell fragments of artillery or mortar rounds. Conceal wire routes crossing open areas from enemy observation. Tag all wire lines at switchboards, and at road, trail, and rail crossings to identify the lines and make repair easier if a line is cut. An overhead line is field wire laid above the ground. Lay overhead lines near command posts, in assembly areas, and along roads where heavy vehicular traffic may drive off the road. Also, lay them at road crossings where trenches cannot be dug, if culverts or bridges are unavailable. Those lines are the least likely to be damaged by vehicles or weather.



TELEPHONE EQUIPMENT



11-19. The telephone set TA-1 is a sound-powered phone with both visual and audible signals. Its range is 4 miles using WD-1 wire. Telephone set TA-312 is a battery-powered phone. Its range is 14 miles using WD-1 wire.



TA-1 TELEPHONE



11-20. To install the TA-1 telephone–


  • Strip away half an inch of insulation from each strand of the WD-1 wire line.


  • Press the spring-loaded line binding posts and insert one strand of the wire into each post.


  • Adjust the signal volume-control knob to LOUD.


  • Press the generator lever several times to call the other operator


  • Listen for the buzzer sound.


  • Turn the buzzer volume-control knob to obtain the desired volume.


  • See if the indicator shows four white luminous markings.


  • If so, press the push-to-talk switch to reset the visual indicator.


TA-312 TELEPHONE



11-21. To install the TA-312 telephone–


  • Strip away 1/2 inch of insulation from each strand of the WD-1 wire line.


  • Press the spring-loaded line binding posts and insert one strand of the wire into each post.


  • Adjust the buzzer volume-control knob to LOUD.


  • Turn the INT-EXT switch to INT.


  • Turn the circuit selector switch to LB.


  • Insert two BA-30 batteries into the battery compartment (one up and one down).


  • Seat the handset firmly in the retaining cradle.


  • Turn the hand crank rapidly a few turns.


  • Remove the handset from the retaining cradle and wait for the other operator to answer.


  • Press the push-to-talk switch to talk.


  • Release the push-to-talk switch to listen.


CE-11 REEL



11-22. The CE-11 reel is a lightweight, portable unit used to lay and pick up short wire lines. It includes the RL-39 band cable-reeling machine, axle, crank, carrying handles, straps ST-34 and ST-35, and telephone set TA-1/PT, all of which may be authorized as a unit or listed separately in the TOE. The DR-8 reel cable and the WD-1/TT field wire (400 feet) are always listed separately from the RL-39 and each other.


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